Skywood Recovery Center

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Website Skywood Recovery Center

Inpatient, outpatient, and detox treatment for…

Substance Abuse

  • Alcohol
  • Opiates
  • Amphetamines
  • Cocaine
  • Prescription Pills
  • Hallucinogens
  • Benzodiazepines

Mental Health

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Co-Occuring Disorders
  • Borderline Personality
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Bipolar
  • Trauma

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844-768-0187

At Skywood Recovery Center, a residential treatment facility under the skies of Augusta, Michigan, we can help you rediscover your authentic self in recovery. You may feel entirely helpless. You may be completely heartbroken over what addiction has done to you and your family. But here, we firmly believe that everyone has the ability to recover. We believe it because we’ve seen real healing revive the lives and hearts of so many who were once hopeless and heartbroken.

300 Acres Underneath Serene Augusta Skies

Skywood Recovery Center in Augusta, MI

Skywood Recovery Center in Augusta, MI

 

Skywood is not just another rehab. Your loved one may have seen the inside and outside of a handful of treatment centers already. You feel like you’ve had enough of the whole “rehab” thing, but the person you love still needs help.  Phone call after phone call has left you convinced that shopping for treatment is a hassle, and no one can guarantee that they are any better than the rest. What could possibly be different about Skywood? Many programs sound the same, hoping to inspire you with clinical terms like “Dialectical Behavior Therapy,” “EMDR,” “medication-assisted treatment,” and more.

All those things are well enough, but how can you tell what kind of experience Skywood offers?

 

Sample Weekly Schedule

Check out the experiences you will gain from our both educational and fun activities. You will grow from our client centered treatment process!

 

Detox

Specific physical and mental changes occur when a person misuses drugs or alcohol. Over time and with repeated use, these changes can develop into a physical or emotional “need” to continue taking the substance. That need may appear in the form of physical dependency or addiction.

Addiction and physical dependence often occur at the same time, but they are actually two different conditions. Physical dependence is a state that occurs when the body has adapted to a drug and needs more and more of it to get the same desired results. Addiction is the condition in which a person seeks the substance compulsively even though the results of use are actually undesirable and dangerous. Both addiction and physical dependence change the reward system of the brain and lead to cravings.

Physical Dependency and Addiction

drugs and alcoholPhysical dependency, substance abuse and addiction are all considered parts of a larger condition known as a “substance use disorder,” a treatable and manageable diagnosis. In most cases, both a physical dependence and an emotional addiction occur at the same time. The combination of these two things makes it difficult to overcome substance use disorders without proper support.

Withdrawal: A Physical Effect of Substance Use Disorder

Physical dependence leads to physical withdrawal symptoms as soon as the substance fully leaves the body. The emotional effects of an addiction place extra stress on the body and mind as well. Withdrawal occurs when the use of the drug or alcohol suddenly stops.

Symptoms of physical withdrawal often include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Anxiety, sweating, heart palpitations
  • Depression and an accompanied temporary loss of interest in daily activity
  • Irritability and heightened level of emotional sensitivity
  • Nausea and loss of desire to eat
  • Cold or flu-like symptoms

For example, in severe cases of alcohol use disorder, withdrawal symptoms may begin within eight hours after the last drink. This means that many people with advanced-stage alcohol use disorder wake up in the morning with a strong physical craving to have more alcohol. Sometimes, however, alcohol withdrawal symptoms do not appear for a few days. When alcohol is not available to the system, these symptoms can persist off and on for weeks.1

The Importance of Healthy Detoxification

Detoxification is a process in which withdrawal symptoms are handled in a controlled and safe manner. In detox, the addicted or physically dependent person is safely distanced from the substance. Although withdrawal symptoms may feel quite intense, individuals can find great relief if they go through the detoxification process with medical supervision and assistance.

Some drugs are dangerous to quit alone. In some instances, sudden cessation of drug use may immediately result in a shock to the body that can actually send an individual to the emergency room. Anyone with an addiction or physical dependency is encouraged to see a doctor who can give suggestions about coming off the substance in a balanced and controlled way.

Treatment 

Today, treatment for addiction can take many forms and incorporate several elements, including residential and outpatient programs, drug or alcohol detox, co-occurring treatment, step-down programs, sober living and aftercare. Addiction treatment has come a long way, with targeted research providing clear direction on which models are the most effective for an individual’s specific needs and pointing to new approaches that deliver better results than the programs of years past.

The cornerstones of treatment are residential programs and intensive outpatient treatment. Both serve a specific purpose, and finding the right fit can be key to long-term success.

When it comes to addiction, residential treatment remains the most successful treatment method and is preferred in most cases. Getting someone out of his or her environment for an extended period to focus solely on sobriety is ideal. Residential treatment is a more intensive program that allows for the maximum amount of time to address not just the physical aspects of addiction, but also to get to the root causes of an individual’s substance or alcohol abuse. Residential programs also offer more comprehensive monitoring when it comes to medication and medical issues.

When it comes to addiction, residential treatment remains the most successful treatment method and is preferred in most cases.

Residential treatment may not be necessary for everyone. Sometimes professional or family obligations make it harder to leave daily life behind to seek treatment. In these cases, an Intensive Outpatient Program (or IOP) can provide flexible treatment near home. Outpatient treatment contains many of the same elements as a residential program, but there is less programming per day (outpatient often consists of half-day sessions), with participants returning home or to sober living accommodations each night throughout the process.

Integrated treatment for co-occurring addiction and mental health conditions allows professionals to address both disorders simultaneously. A staggeringly high percentage of those dealing with addiction issues also struggle with a co-occurring mental health issues like depression, trauma, anxiety or bipolar disorder.

Co-occurring disorders affect more than 10 million Americans each year, and research and practice have proven that people are much more likely to achieve and maintain a high quality of life if both issues are treated at the same time.

Mental Health

More than 18 percent of the total US population struggles with a mental illness, according to data from 2012 produced by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. But what do mental health issues have to do with drug or alcohol treatment? A very high percentage of those seeking treatment for addiction are found to be suffering from a mental health disorder as well. DepressionPTSDbipolarADHD and trauma can all make someone more likely to battle addiction.

Depression
Anxiety
Bipolar Disorder
PTSD
Trauma
Borderline Personality Disorder
Mood Disorder
ADD/ADHD

It’s not uncommon for someone to turn to drugs or alcohol to self-medicate, either because they are unaware they have a mental health issue, the problem has gone undiagnosed or they don’t like the medication prescribed for their condition and how it makes them feel. Unfortunately, these substances may quiet symptoms in the short term, but over time they only exacerbate the mental health issues, they never heal them. Then as the individual becomes addicted, they now have yet another problem to address.

In the past, substance abuse and mental health issues were treated separately without any connection. Over time, it became clear that this outdated model was less than ideal. As we grow in our understanding of the connection between mental health and addiction, treatment professionals have developed a dual diagnosis approach to treat these co-occurring disorders simultaneously. Today, the experts acknowledge that treating these issues together is key, and integrated treatment is accepted as the best option for lasting long-term sobriety.

…treating these issues together is key, and integrated treatment is accepted as the best option for lasting long-term sobriety

Mental health issues and addiction have been misunderstood for far too long. We’re making great strides at removing the stigma from both of these medical conditions, but its only by understanding these issues and treating them appropriately that we can see real change. Any number of programs can be successful in ending abusive or addictive behavior for a period of time. Only by addressing the underlying issues and getting to the root of the addiction – including looking at any contributing mental or emotional issues – can we provide the best opportunity for true and lasting recovery.

Integrated Addiction and Mental Health Treatment at Skywood

At Skywood, we treat co-occurring addiction and mental health conditions. To find out more about what we do and how we can help you, contact us today. We can assess your situation, answer your questions and point you in the right direction for further assistance.

Admissions

When you or a loved one needs help, dealing with insurance benefits and travel arrangements may be the last thing you want to worry about. Our admissions coordinators answer a wide range of questions related to addiction and treatment, and they can tell you whether treatment is needed, what kind may be best and what insurance will cover. Our goal is simple: to provide honest, straightforward, life-changing help.

VERIFYING YOUR BENEFITS

Our admissions team starts by gathering information to help determine if treatment is needed, and if so, what kind. Cost is usually a primary concern, so confirming your benefits for free is our first step. Insurance coverage for addiction treatment is a complex system, and changes are constantly being made to benefits programs. This is where our experience proves invaluable. We work with insurance providers to determine what is covered and help you calculate any out-of-pocket costs.

Some of the insurance providers we work with:

  • Aetna
  • Cigna
  • ComPsych
  • CoreSource
  • Exclusive Care
  • Humana
  • Magellan
  • MultiPlan
  • Priority Health
  • ValueOptions

FINDING THE RIGHT FIT

We work with everyone who calls to find them the help they need, even if it’s not through one of our programs. We don’t measure success in the number of slots filled; we measure it by the number of people helped. In that first call, we’re already building a detailed medical record for you. It’s all part of the process to provide the best information on programs, pricing and length of treatment to fit your specific needs. We can also help book travel, arrange airport pick-up and remain in regular contact until you walk through the door.

ARRIVING AT YOUR DESTINATION

Even with all that help, you may still be feeling unsure when you arrive at treatment. It’s perfectly natural to be a little nervous, but there’s nothing mysterious about the process. Everyone admitted to a treatment program starts out at admissions. It’s typical to meet with an intake specialist for an assessment to determine the complete range of issues you’re facing. While you may have sought treatment for an addiction to one substance, there may be other secondary substances that are contributing to the problem. There may also be underlying mental health issues – including trauma, anxiety and depression – that have gone undiagnosed or unrecognized. An honest account of what you’ve been using and how frequently can also help determine if detox is needed or what types of medication may be necessary to help you through the initial stages of withdrawal.

This is all done without judgment or shaming. It’s simply information-gathering with a higher purpose. To reach out in a time of need can make someone feel extremely vulnerable, but the information you provide is completely confidential. When you turn to us for help, we believe that’s a sacred trust, and we are committed to doing all we can to assist you in finding the help you need and leading you to the path of recovery. Contact us today to find out how we can help you.

844-768-0187

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